Pathfinder Second Edition: Gamemastery Guide

Pathfinder Second Edition: Gamemastery Guide

The Pathfinder Second Edition Core Rulebook and Bestiary books give someone everything they need to design and run their own campaign and everything that a player needs to play in one package. There are hundreds of player options, plus several tips and tricks peppered throughout, but maybe you want even more pointers. Well, that’s where the books that continue the Rulebook line come in—starting with the Gamemastery Guide, which provides game masters more options to enhance their games.
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Animal Crossing: New Horizons, Vol. 1: Deserted Island Diary Reveals Tom Nook’s Side of the Story

Animal Crossing: New Horizons, Vol. 1: Deserted Island Diary Reveals Tom Nook’s Side of the Story

Tom Nook gets a bad rap when it comes to Animal Crossing fans’ opinions of him. There may be something to be said about the capitalistic island state that he manages, but when Animal Crossing: New Horizons came out, the game’s creator, Nintendo, insisted that he was a good guy. Animal Crossing: New Horizons, Vol. 1: Deserted Island Diary tells us that, though he might not necessarily be a good guy, his experience with some islanders justifies some of his managerial decisions. (more…)

Pathfinder Second Edition: Gamemastery Guide

Pathfinder Second Edition: The Bestiaries

In the second of my Pathfinder Second Edition reviews, I’ll be taking a deeper look into the three volumes that fuel gamemasters with monsters to beset upon their players, for all adventuring parties need foes to vanquish. The bestiary series is where you get your demons and dragons, your angels and aboleths (renamed alghollthus for Second Edition). The first Second Edition Bestiary is 334 pages of monster stats with about another 20 pages of supplemental rules, glossaries, and indexes. The second and third books in the series clock in at an additional 319 pages each. (more…)

Pathfinder Second Edition: Gamemastery Guide

Pathfinder Second Edition: Secrets of Magic

Two things are immediately noticeable about Secrets of Magic. The first is that it is an absolutely gorgeous book. From the front cover’s beautiful bordering and flashy Wayne Reynolds painting to the interior’s ornate pages and wonderful evocative artwork, this may well be one of the best-looking books Paizo has ever published. The second thing you’ll notice is that it doesn’t match the rest of the line. Secrets of Magic is part of the Pathfinder Second Edition rulebook line, which until this volume had just been books that had been published in the first edition of the game as well. The six books that were released before Secrets of Magic all have uniform covers with tan and brown trade dress, and tabs on the front cover denoting Second Edition and the back cover denoting “Rulebook.” Secrets of Magic, however, has a navy blue trade dress, and instead of tabs, the Second Edition and “Rulebook” notations are worked better into the overall trade dress to fit the feel of the book. (more…)

Pathfinder Second Edition: Gamemastery Guide

Pathfinder Second Edition: Core Rulebook

As of right now, there are six Pathfinder Second Edition rulebooks. The rulebooks in Paizo’s product lines are the backbones of the rulesets. These are the books that are most necessary to run a game. Truly, the two you need the most are the Core Rulebook and the first Bestiary. These are the bases on which to start building out your game; every other book in the line just adds more options to enhance things. While I feel like many of the changes that Paizo has made to the Core Rulebook are great revisions to a system I already loved, I’m happy to dive into just what makes this new edition worth looking into. (more…)

Speed Dating for Ghosts Is My Ideal Game

Speed Dating for Ghosts Is My Ideal Game

I have written before about how I’m a picky gamer and pretty much only want to play visual novels myself (although I will watch other people play games). I’m glad I found three short games in the giant game bundle for racial justice equality that interested me, but I also found something I didn’t expect—a long game that I enjoyed! (For me, a “long” game is a game that takes more than an hour.) It fit all my requirements: no difficult controls or mechanics, but lots of story and character development. Throw in little tidbits of lore about the ghost world and hell and a motley crew of characters with sweet, scary, complex stories, and you’ve got my perfect game: Speed Dating for Ghosts.

Content warning for light/stylized depictions of mouth and eye trauma, as well as brief discussion of prolonged bleeding, at the end of the piece.

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